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Reading

 

READ! READ! READ!

GET HOOKED ON BOOKS

There are so many fantastic books just waiting for YOU

 

It is important to choose the right book. Can you read it independently? Read the blurb. Does it interest you? Choose a book that you will enjoy. 

Each week try and build up your reading stamina. Perhaps start reading for 15 - 20 minutes each day. Then challenge yourself to read for longer lengths of time. Flex those reading muscles and make it your aim to focus for a whole hour.

Tell others, including your teachers, about good books you have read. Mrs Payne and Mrs Wallis love recommendations.

 

GO ON! Feed your brain. Grab a bite to read.

 

 

 

 

REMEMBER - YOUR READING DIARY SHOULD BE IN SCHOOL EVERY DAY SO THAT YOU CAN RECORD YOUR READING

 

Look after all of your books. A school book bag is the best way to transport them.

 

  BOOKS ARE FRIENDS

Friends don't like to be...

Thumped and bumped

Torn and scribbled on

Wiped with dirty hands

Splattered with food and drink

Bent backwards

PLEASE TREAT BOOKS LIKE A FRIEND -

WITH CARE AND COURTESY AND LOVE

 

 

PARENTS

Please continue to read with your child and write in their Reading Diary. Some parents have asked  what they should be writing in the Reading Diary. We have put together a list of possible comments. They are just a guide. Feel free to alter the comments or write in your own words. 

Try and make the time spent reading with your child FUN. Make it a treat. Your child will start to associate reading with something enjoyable. They will want to read more.

HAPPY READING

 

READING IN MORPURGO CLASS

One of the ways we teach reading is through whole class guided reading. We focus on key reading skills. We also choose books carefully to encourage enjoyment.

 

Reading Comprehension 

Comprehension is the understanding and interpretation of what is read. To be able to accurately understand written material, children need the following skills:

  •  Decoding skills so that they can 'sound out'  words that are written down.
  • Fluency so that they can instantly recognise words, including those that they can't  sound out. The main way to build up reading fluency is to read often.
  • Building up a strong vocabulary and learning the meaning of words is important. Children learn vocabulary through talk, everyday experience and reading.
  • Understanding how sentences are built (sentence construction) and connection ideas within and between sentences (cohesion) are important skills for reading comprehension.
  • Reasoning and background knowledge. Most readers relate what they've read to what they know. Children need to be able to 'read between the lines' and pull out meaning even when it is not literally spelled out.
  •  When children read, attention allows them to take in information from the text. Working memory allows them to hold on to that information and use it to gain meaning and build knowledge from what they're reading.

     

Tackling Reading Comprehension

Home Learning

1. Read the text

2. Read the text again and underline (with a ruler and pencil) any words you can't read. Ask an adult for help.

3. Read the text a third time. If you do not know the meaning of a word, highlight it. Use a dictionary to find the meaning of the word. Ask an adult to tell you what the word means.

 

Put your reading skills into action and answer the comprehension questions.

 

Literal Questions

The answer is literally right there in the text. We can skim and scan the text to look for key words and find the answers.

 

Deductive Questions

There is a clue, proof or evidence in the text to help you to answer the question. 

 

Inference Questions

You need to think really carefully about the text. Your answer should be an educated guess  based on the clues that you find in the text, and your understanding of the world. You will need to clearly explain your opinion, backing it up using clues within the text. It is important to explain how you got your answer

 

WHAT CAN YOU INFER FROM THIS PICTURE BY AARON BECKER?

 

Credit Aaron Becker 

This picture can be found in Aaron Becker's book, Journey. It is an exciting picture book.

 

 

 

2. Read the text again. Underline (with a pencil or ruler) any words you cannot read. Ask for help.

3. Read the text again.  If you do not know the meaning of a word, highlight it.  Use a dictionary to find the meaning or ask  somebody to tell you what the word means.

 

 

 

Are you looking for the perfect book gift? Click here

 

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